How to Build Your Board Resume

Written by:
Deborah Rosati, FCPA, FCA, ICD.D
Corporate Director, Co-founder & CEO, Women Get On Board

We would like to thank our Event Partner, Stanton Chase Toronto with Managing Partners Cathy Logue and Joanne  Elek for their support of  our April 6th Roundtable Event “How to Build Your Board Resume.” We also appreciate the participation of our moderator Kelly McDougald and our panellists Lisa Melchior and Tom Muir.

Building a Board Resume is a journey that involves many stages. It’s a continuous process of showcasing yourself as a board candidate through documentation, networking and interviews.

The concept of “wisdom trumps knowledge” and how this can add value to a Board

Even those who have deep experience and functional knowledge don’t always have all the answers. Wisdom is a combination of knowledge, judgment, and experience — all important components that go into good decision-making.

Some people feel that if they don’t have a CPA designation they don’t add value, but that’s not the case. Each board member has different things to contribute, and brings a unique perspective and experience. Sometimes, the most effective people to contribute to discussion and debate are those with the least subject knowledge because they can be objective.

The importance of being “multi-dimensional” for a potential board opportunity

During an interview, will you will be asked about your area of expertise and to demonstrate how much depth you have in your area of specialty. Over the course of your career it’s important to become an expert on something because it will increase your unique value. Board members will see not just how much knowledge you have, but more importantly, how you reflected on it and spent time applying that knowledge. They will look for your examples of how you handled decision-making in a stressful or difficult situation. Give them scenarios of how you worked through a very complex problem and produced great results. It’s about demonstrating where you lean-in and take leadership roles on committees and sub committees. Don’t be afraid to talk about your experiences.

The difference between a career resume and a board resume

A career resume highlights the roles and accomplishments you have achieved as a professional. A board resume showcases your unique value proposition and what skills/expertise and industry knowledge you bring to a board. You should demonstrate the governance leadership roles you have taken in the boards you have served on, i.e. what committees you have chaired, and highlight your board journey with the various boards you have served on.

Do you need governance education to serve on a board?

A common question among individuals embarking on a board career is whether or not they need to have a formal governance certification or designation (C.Dir or ICD.D). While it provides a valuable base to prepare you for board roles, it is not always a requirement. Your skills/expertise and board governance experience along with your industry knowledge are what boards look for first.

Three Tips on how to enhance your board experience & skills

  1. Demonstrate leadership by joining a committee, and demonstrating your strengths and skills. Try to get on committees and chair committees that are away from your functional area. For example, if you are in finance, try HR or a quality committee to broaden your scope and experience.
  2. Find a topic that you are passionate about and you will engage people in a more meaningful way. You can increase your engagement by going to workshops and seminars where you can connect with others in the same niche.
  3. Stay current with industry trends by reading articles and director’s journals on change management and organizational development. Keep yourself well versed on new management techniques, as it gives you the ability to engage and understand current events and trends.

 

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